Coronavirus news

Despite the Government’s recent relaxation of the coronavirus restrictions we still politely ask any member of the public considering visiting Sedbergh and the surrounding area to please think again and avoid travelling to visit the area at the moment.

We have an ageing and at risk community and we would like to be able to offer as much protection as possible to them. We believe an extra few weeks of safe guarding will go a long way for the long term safety and health of our residents.

Additionally, in Cumbria, we have one of the highest rates of confirmed infection in the country and our visitors' safety is also incredibly important to us. Again, we believe those few extra weeks will reduce the risk of visitors being exposed to the virus and, in turn, protect their own families and communities.

  • Please be alert to the risks of catching and spreading the infection by staying local for a few weeks longer.
  • Toilets and most shops in Sedbergh remain closed, as do pubs and cafés.
  • Many of our footpaths pass through farmyards and the ageing farming community are particularly vulnerable.
  • Mountain rescue teams may not be available as they rely on volunteers, many of whom work in the NHS and other frontline professions.

Further details and information about the risks and problems facing rural areas such as ours can be found on the Yorkshire Dales National Park and Lake District websites.

We hope to have your understanding and look forward to welcoming you back in the not too distant future when both the community and visitors can enjoy our beautiful scenery and outside space safely.

The church remained in the family’s ownership until 1918, and was declared redundant in 1984. It is now in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust and is open to visitors every day.

The furniture and fittings are of exceptional quality with woodwork by Waring & Gillow of Lancaster.

Interior of St. Gregory's ChurchThe stained glass windows, designed by Frederick George Simon,were installed when the church was altered in the early 1900’s. They are unusual in that, instead of religious themes. most of them depict scenes of nature, including river scenes, trees, plants, and birds and animals found in the surrounding area.

Interior of St. Gregory's ChurchClick on the thumbnail images below to see full size images of some of the windows.