Farfield Mill has exhibitions about wool and weaving, craft workshops, crafts and books to buy and a pleasant café.

Time: 30-60 minutes each way, plus time spent at the Mill.
Easy walking, varied scenery and good birdlife by the river.
Not suitable for prams, buggies or wheelchairs.

Farfield Mill walkStarting from Sedbergh Information and Book Centre, turn left and walk to the end of the street; keep going past Westwood Books on the left; at the zebra crossing cross over the main road and continue to walk in the same direction, past Settlebeck School, to the junction of the A683 with the A684 to Garsdale.

Farfield Mill walkTurn onto the A684 for about 200 metres until you reach New Bridge. Take the path on the left just before the bridge, and walk upstream with the River Rawthey on your right.

 

Farfield Mill walk

Along this stretch of the river there are often duck to be seen and, in summer, lots of swallows.

Farfield Mill walk

Continue to follow the path keeping the river on your right.

You will come to a series of gates, steep steps and stiles as well as a little bridge.

 

Farfield Mill walk

At the foot of the steps you will see the Clough River joining the Rawthey.

Farfield Mill walkThe last field before the road often contains rare breed Hebridean sheep.

Farfield Mill walk

Both the path and the river bend left and ahead you will be able to see stone steps over a wall that will take you briefly onto the main A683 road.

Turn right here over the bridge and you will see a tarmac track going off on your right.

Farfield Mill walk

Follow this track for a few hundred metres until it comes to a bridge and a row of three-storey cottages, formerly weavers’ cottages.

There is a path leading uphill beside the first cottage; follow it, and in a short distance you will see Farfield Mill Arts and Heritage Centre on your left.
Farfield Mill walk

The best way to return is to retrace your steps. However, if you don’t mind the traffic, you may turn left at the row of cottages and follow the lane to the A684, where you turn right to walk back into Sedbergh.

Words by Hilary Dixon. Photos by Chris Wood