Dent and Dentdale.

Dent village

Cobbled streets in Dent

The beautiful secluded valley of Dentdale lies just a few miles away. The road from Sedbergh passes through peaceful pastures before reaching Dent village, a charming place with narrow streets and cobble stones, a lovely old church, two excellent pubs and a couple of cafes. Further up the valley is the remote hamlet of Cowgill and, off to the left, the even more remote Dent Station (on the Settle-Carlisle line). The road finally winds its way up under Dent Head viaduct to join the B6255 Ribblehead to Hawes road.

Find out more about Dent and Dentdale at www.dentdale.com


Kirkby Stephen

Kirkby Stephen

Kirkby Stephen

Kirkby Stephen is a thriving market town in the Upper Eden Valley and lies on the famous Coast to Coast walk. It has a fine selection of shops, pubs and restaurants and some good walks from the town centre, including the ascent of Nine Standards Rigg.

For more information see www.kirkby-stephen.com


Kirkby Lonsdale

Kirkby Lonsdale Church

Kirkby Lonsdale Church

Kirkby Lonsdale is a characterful little town 8 miles south of Sedbergh and was recently used by the  BBC in the filming of “Jamaica Inn”. There are many good shops and eateries and several excellent pubs. A lovely walk takes you along the banks of the river Lune from Devil’s Bridge to Ruskin View.

For more information see www.kirkbylonsdale.co.uk


Mallerstang & Pendragon Castle

Pendragon Castle

Pendragon Castle

Mallerstang is a fabulous valley which runs from the Moorcock Inn on the A684 Hawes road down to Kirkby Stephen. In places the road runs parallel to the Settle-Carlisle railway line, making it an excellent place for train spotting. The valley narrows as the road passes beneath Wild Boar Fell and through the picturesque hamlet of Outhgill. A couple of miles further on lie the ruins of Pendragon Castle, reputedly built by Uther Pendragon and owned by Lady Anne Clifford in the 17th century.

Mallerstang community has its own website at www.freewebs.com/mallerstang/


Hawes, Wensleydale & Swaledale

Hawes waterfall

Hawes waterfall

The A684 from Sedbergh runs through the beautiful valley of Garsdale before passing into Yorkshire at Garsdale Head. The road then begins to drop down into upper Wensleydale, passing through the charming village of Appersett before reaching the busy market town of Hawes. Here, as well as many shops, pubs & eateries, you will find the Wensleydale Cheese Factory (a must for cheese lovers) and the Dales Countryside Museum.

Continuing down Wensleydale you will come to the villages of Bainbridge and Aysgarth where a side road takes you to the spectacular medieval Bolton Castle.

Tour de France on the Buttertubs Pass

Tour de France on the Buttertubs Pass

Alternatively turn north from Hawes to travel over the famous Buttertubs Pass (the Cote de Buttertubs where an estimated 10,000 people watched the Tour de France in 2014). Pause at the layby shortly after the summit to look into the enormous limestone holes where the devil is said to have stored his butter. The road then takes you steeply down into the remote valley of Swaledale and the villages of Muker and Gunnerside.


The Lake District

Waterhead, Ambleside

Waterhead, Ambleside

Sedbergh provides a quiet, peaceful base to explore the fells and valleys of the eastern Lake District. Windermere can be reached in a little over half an hour, while Keswick is about 45 minutes away via the M6.

For an introductory tour follow the A684 to Kendal then take the B5284 via Crook to Windermere lake. Turn right and follow the A592 through Bowness then on up through Troutbeck to Kirkstone Pass (watch out in winter, this road quickly becomes impassable). Drop down tthrough Glenridding and along the shores of Ulswater to eventually join the A66 at the Rheged centre near Penrith. Throughout the tour you will find many places to stop and admire the view, take a stroll, or to have something to eat. Return to Sedbergh via the M6.


Kendal

Kendal town centre

Kendal town centre

Kendal is our nearest large town. An historic place which originally built its prosperity on the wool trade, there are many fascinating old yards and buildings to explore, as well as specialist shops and well known high street brands.

The Brewery Arts Centre is a renowned drama, music and cinema venue.

Abbot Hall is a small art gallery with one of the finest collections of 18th, 19th & 20th Century paintings in Britain and regular highly regarded exhibitions. Next door is the award winning Museum of Lakeland Life & Industry  where you can learn much more about the development, history and culture of the area.

Kendal is also the home of the Quaker Tapestry which depicts the Quaker influence on the modern world through a series of over 40 embroidered panels.

Kendal Leisure Centre hosts a variety of activities and has a 25m main swimming pool and a 12.5m learner pool.


Sizergh Castle

Sizergh Castle

Sizergh Castle

Owned by the National Trust Sizergh Castle lies a few miles south of Kendal. Home to the Strickland family the fine historic house is open to the public, as are the stunning gardens. There is a large National Trust shop and tearoom and extensive grounds to wander in.